Interior of Bach Church at Arnstadt with 1703 Wender organ in 3rd floor balcony
Interior of Bach Church at Arnstadt with 1703 Wender organ in 3rd floor balcony
Interior of Bach church at Arnstadt
Interior of Bach church at Arnstadt
Case of the 1703 Wender organ at the Bach Church in Arnstadt
Case of the 1703 Wender organ at the Bach Church in Arnstadt
Case of the 1703 Wender organ in the Bach Church at Arnstadt
Case of the 1703 Wender organ in the Bach Church at Arnstadt
Hoffman reconstruction of original keydesk of the 1703 Wender organ of the Bach Church in Arnstadt, accurately detailed to exact original measurements as J.S. Bach knew it and as it operates the instrument today
Hoffman reconstruction of original keydesk of the 1703 Wender organ of the Bach Church in Arnstadt, accurately detailed to exact original measurements as J.S. Bach knew it and as it operates the instrument today
Hoffman reconstruction of pedalboard of 1703 Wender organ at the Bach church in Arnstadt
Hoffman reconstruction of pedalboard of 1703 Wender organ at the Bach church in Arnstadt
Original manuals, drawknobs, and rack of 1703 Wender organ keydesk in Bach museum at Arnstadt
Original manuals, drawknobs, and rack of 1703 Wender organ keydesk in Bach museum at Arnstadt
Original keys and drawknobs of 1703 Wender keydesk in Bach museum at
Arnstadt, manual compass 8-foot CCDD-c3d3, (48 notes), pedal compass CCDD-c1d1, 25 notes
Original keys and drawknobs of 1703 Wender keydesk in Bach museum at Arnstadt, manual compass 8-foot CCDD-c3d3, (48 notes), pedal compass CCDD-c1d1, 25 notes
Original keydesk and bench of 1703 Wender organ from Bach Church in Arnstadt, now in Bach museum
Original keydesk and bench of 1703 Wender organ from Bach Church in Arnstadt, now in Bach museum
Bach Arnstadt memory plate with message in German script which reads "Johann Sebastian Bach started working his first Organist's position from 1703-1707 in this house of God"
Bach Arnstadt memory plate with message in German script which reads "Johann Sebastian Bach started working his first Organist's position from 1703-1707 in this house of God"
copy of Praeludium in g minor BWV 535/1 by J.S. Bach
copy of Praeludium in g minor BWV 535/1 by J.S. Bach
Opening page of Ringk's copy of d minor Toccata & Fugue for organ BWV 565 (top staff soprano clef) by J.S. Bach
Opening page of Ringk's copy of d minor Toccata & Fugue for organ BWV 565 (top staff soprano clef) by J.S. Bach
Opening page of "Little" Fugue in g minor BWV 578 by J.S. Bach
Opening page of "Little" Fugue in g minor BWV 578 by J.S. Bach
Erfurt portrait c. 1715 of unknown subject thought to be J.S. Bach
Erfurt portrait c. 1715 of unknown subject thought to be J.S. Bach
Opening page of c minor Passacaglia BWV 582 (top staff soprano clef) by J.S. Bach
Opening page of c minor Passacaglia BWV 582 (top staff soprano clef) by J.S. Bach
Opening page of organ Toccata in F Major BWV 540 by J.S. Bach
Opening page of organ Toccata in F Major BWV 540 by J.S. Bach
Opening page of No. 1 (C Major) 2-part Invention BWV 772 (top staff soprano clef) by J.S. Bach
Opening page of No. 1 (C Major) 2-part Invention BWV 772 (top staff soprano clef) by J.S. Bach
Opening page of No. 4 (d minor) 2-part Invention BWV 775 (top staff soprano clef) by J.S. Bach
Opening page of No. 4 (d minor) 2-part Invention BWV 775 (top staff soprano clef) by J.S. Bach
Opening page of No. 8 (F Major) 2-part Invention BWV 779 (top staff soprano clef) by J.S. Bach
Opening page of No. 8 (F Major) 2-part Invention BWV 779 (top staff soprano clef) by J.S. Bach
Signature of J.S. Bach after 1723
Signature of J.S. Bach after 1723
J.S. Bach sitting at an organ c. 1725, from a print in the British Museum
J.S. Bach sitting at an organ c. 1725, from a print in the British Museum
Opening page of Eb Major Prelude BWV 552 from Clavieruebung Part III (top staff treble clef) by J.S. Bach
Opening page of Eb Major Prelude BWV 552 from Clavieruebung Part III (top staff treble clef) by J.S. Bach
Final page of triple Fugue in Eb Major for Organ, from Clavieruebung III by J.S. Bach
Final page of triple Fugue in Eb Major for Organ, from Clavieruebung III by J.S. Bach
3D likeness sculpture of what Bach looked like c.1740 made by visual artist Hadi Karimi
3D likeness sculpture of what Bach looked like c.1740 made by visual artist Hadi Karimi
3D likeness sculpture of what Bach looked like c.1740 made by visual artist Hadi Karimi
3D likeness sculpture of what Bach looked like c.1740 made by visual artist Hadi Karimi
3D likeness sculpture of what Bach looked like c.1740 made by visual artist Hadi Karimi
3D likeness sculpture of what Bach looked like c.1740 made by visual artist Hadi Karimi
3D likeness sculpture of what Bach looked like c.1740 made by visual artist Hadi Karimi
3D likeness sculpture of what Bach looked like c.1740 made by visual artist Hadi Karimi
3D likeness sculpture of what Bach looked like c.1740 made by visual artist Hadi Karimi
3D likeness sculpture of what Bach looked like c.1740 made by visual artist Hadi Karimi
Fugue No. 17 in Ab Major from Part II of Well-Tempered Clavier (1744)
Fugue No. 17 in Ab Major from Part II of Well-Tempered Clavier (1744)
1746 Hausmann portrait of J.S. Bach holding his triple canon for 6 voices, presented to Mizler Musical Society of Leipzig when he became its 14th member, known to be authentic
1746 Hausmann portrait of J.S. Bach holding his triple canon for 6 voices, presented to Mizler Musical Society of Leipzig when he became its 14th member, known to be authentic
1748 Haussmann portrait of J.S. Bach in same pose, known to be authentic, original valued at 2.5 million dollars
1748 Haussmann portrait of J.S. Bach in same pose, known to be authentic, original valued at 2.5 million dollars
Bach's 13th canon (canon triplex in 6 voices, as shown in Hausmann portrait) deciphered, showing 3 separate 2-voice canons, each in inverse movement, perpetually repeating.
Bach's 13th canon (canon triplex in 6 voices, as shown in Hausmann portrait) deciphered, showing 3 separate 2-voice canons, each in inverse movement, perpetually repeating.
Painting promoted as a "portrait of J.S. Bach" c. 1747 by French painter Antoine Pesne seriously at variance with both Haussmann portraits and considered inauthentic
Painting promoted as a "portrait of J.S. Bach" c. 1747 by French painter Antoine Pesne seriously at variance with both Haussmann portraits and considered inauthentic
Likeness of J.S. Bach standing in the Madame Tussauds wax museum located in Berlin, Germany.
Likeness of J.S. Bach standing in the Madame Tussauds wax museum located in Berlin, Germany.
Bach melodic signature (Bb-A-C-B) as written into The Art of Fugue
Bach melodic signature (Bb-A-C-B) as written into The Art of Fugue
Volbach portrait c. 1750, painted during J.S. Bach's final weeks or months when subject was in pain and blinded by Taylor's operations, considered authentic
Volbach portrait c. 1750, painted during J.S. Bach's final weeks or months when subject was in pain and blinded by Taylor's operations, considered authentic
Tomb of J.S. Bach, St. Thomas Church, Leipzig
Tomb of J.S. Bach, St. Thomas Church, Leipzig
Tomb of J.S. Bach, St. Thomas Church, Leipzig
Tomb of J.S. Bach, St. Thomas Church, Leipzig
Tomb of J.S. Bach, St. Thomas Church, Leipzig
Tomb of J.S. Bach, St. Thomas Church, Leipzig
1908 statue of J.S. Bach by Leipzig sculptor Carl Seffner standing in the courtyard of St. Thomas Church,
Leipzig
1908 statue of J.S. Bach by Leipzig sculptor Carl Seffner standing in the courtyard of St. Thomas Church, Leipzig
Seffner statue of J.S. Bach standing in courtyard of St. Thomas Church, Leipzig
Seffner statue of J.S. Bach standing in courtyard of St. Thomas Church, Leipzig
Seffner statue of J.S. Bach standing in courtyard of St. Thomas Church, Leipzig
Seffner statue of J.S. Bach standing in courtyard of St. Thomas Church, Leipzig
Seffner statue of J.S. Bach, courtyard of St. Thomas Church,  Leipzig
Seffner statue of J.S. Bach, courtyard of St. Thomas Church, Leipzig
Seffner statue of J.S. Bach, courtyard of St. Thomas Church, Leipzig
Seffner statue of J.S. Bach, courtyard of St. Thomas Church, Leipzig
Seffner statue of J.S. Bach, courtyard of St. Thomas Church,
Leipzig
Seffner statue of J.S. Bach, courtyard of St. Thomas Church, Leipzig
close-up of Seffner statue of J.S. Bach, courtyard of St. Thomas Church, Leipzig
close-up of Seffner statue of J.S. Bach, courtyard of St. Thomas Church, Leipzig
2008 digital computer reproduction of J.S. Bach's face based upon a bronze cast of his skull, considered the most authentic that can be forensically reconstructed
2008 digital computer reproduction of J.S. Bach's face based upon a bronze cast of his skull, considered the most authentic that can be forensically reconstructed
2008 forensic reconstruction of J.S. Bach based upon a bronze cast of his skull
2008 forensic reconstruction of J.S. Bach based upon a bronze cast of his skull
Entrance bust of Bach in Bach Museum, Leipzig, life-size marble sculpture by Carl Seffner depicting the subject at approximately 60 years of age (1745)
Entrance bust of Bach in Bach Museum, Leipzig, life-size marble sculpture by Carl Seffner depicting the subject at approximately 60 years of age (1745)
crushed marble figurine of J.S. Bach created by A. Giannelli in Volterra, Italy
crushed marble figurine of J.S. Bach created by A. Giannelli in Volterra, Italy
the spirit of J.S. Bach the organist, on the bench
the spirit of J.S. Bach the organist, on the bench
First page of score of Praeludium, Chorale, and Fugue for Organ by Steven Monrotus, a spacious tripartite work dedicated to the memory of J.S. Bach having his melodic signature (Bb-A-C-B) inserted in a middle voice in all 3 sections.
First page of score of Praeludium, Chorale, and Fugue for Organ by Steven Monrotus, a spacious tripartite work dedicated to the memory of J.S. Bach having his melodic signature (Bb-A-C-B) inserted in a middle voice in all 3 sections.
The JSB Monogram
The JSB Monogram
First page of score of "Jig" Fugue in A Major for Organ by Steven Monrotus, a work inspired by Bach's G Major "Jig" Fugue for Organ.
First page of score of "Jig" Fugue in A Major for Organ by Steven Monrotus, a work inspired by Bach's G Major "Jig" Fugue for Organ.
Quotation attributed to J.S. Bach
Quotation attributed to J.S. Bach
If one had to guess which of the spectators identified in this photo would be saying that there is always something to learn from the man in the hole but who has time for it ... it would be Beethoven ... because he did.
If one had to guess which of the spectators identified in this photo would be saying that there is always something to learn from the man in the hole but who has time for it ... it would be Beethoven ... because he did.
Every serious composer following after Bach must be his disciple
Every serious composer following after Bach must be his disciple

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) is a much with us today as Michelangelo, Shakespeare, Newton, Galileo, Da Vinci, Beethoven, Einstein, and other giants from the past.  All roads musically, to some degree or another, no matter how tenuous, either lead up to or lead back to him.  Among musicians his surname is a colossal syllable, one which makes composers tremble, brings performers to their knees, and has become synonymous at once with a synthesis of styles and a radiation of influence.  His compositions still form the kernel of the Organ repertoire to this very day, and every organist must be his disciple.

Bach is with us, and will always be with us, for much the same reason as Holy Scripture is with us and will always be with us.  He's a ground and an anchor in an ever-shifting world, an architect in musical sound as fundamental as Newtonian physics, superceded by but forming the basis of all subsequent progress in his domain.  His almost superhuman invention and vast musical world, while not always speaking our mental language, nevertheless rises to a level of insight and meaning that has very few peers, and no palpable superiors, in the creative arts.  It's no stretch to say that if all the music ever written except for Bach's would somehow be lost forever, music would still survive.


BOTTOM LINE:  The world has produced an innumerable number of musical geniuses down through the ages, but J.S. Bach seems to be something beyond all of them.  Through sheer hard work and determination He immersed himself in the study of every major composer before him, and every musical genius since him has eaten bread from his table.  This cannot be said about any other name from history save perhaps for Beethoven's, who arguably runs a very close second.

 Praeludium, Chorale, and Fugue in d minor for Organ Op. 10


from Eight Pieces for Organ Op. 10-17 by Steven Monrotus


is an extended tripartite work composed to honor J.S. Bach.


This music incorporates the multi-sectional style of the 17th century North German "stylus phantasticus" Baroque organ toccata in the Praeludium.  The 4-voice Fugue is written in quadruple counterpoint with 3 countersubjects.  Bach's 4-note melodic signature Bb-A-C-B is deliberately worked into the counterpoint in all 3 parts of this piece which are all constructed upon the same melodic motif.  This lends a very strong sense of unity to the entire work.  The central Chorale also has been made available separately as Chorale in d minor for Organ Op. 9.  It is scored in keyboard style for hands only and is playable on a one-manual organ with no pedals, a harmonium, or piano.

Photos 1: Bach Album

Share this page